Thoughts about Richard Runciman Terry (1864-1938) Musician, Composer

Introduction

Richard Runciman Terry (1864-1938) is something of an enigma. He is variously described in many articles as a musicologist, organist, scholar and editor. In fact, the case for making these assertions appears to be overstated and the exact nature of some of his contributions to historical musical practice is under-investigated. Nevertheless, Terry remains a good composer who needs some sensible and sympathetic definitive recordings. He also needs some corrections as to his date of birth, places of work, qualifications and methods of working. After that, Terry can be viewed from a more accurate perspective – not to belittle his work but to show his true capabilities as a down-to-earth demonstrator and a composer who both understood and knew how to write for amateur voices.

Through reappraisal it is likely that what might emerge will be a picture of a successful composer of music for worship and music for Christmas, along with other secular compositions and arrangements, all of which over the last 120 years have enjoyed some considerable prominence in the lives of many people. In addition to which his pioneer broadcasting work on BBC radio in the 1920s and 1930s should be taken into account for his contribution is these days all but forgotten.

There is no doubt that he was an enthusiastic musician who sought to produce accessible and useful versions of polyphonic music for people to use – particularly in churches. But Terry’s own works are due for reappraisal too. His own masses and music for Easter and Christmas were very well known throughout his life and remained so after his death. But changes in church music and school singing in the 1960s relegated Terry’s music to dusty cupboards and gradually, apart from a couple of pieces of Christmas music and one introit, his work became largely forgotten. Copies of his church music are now scarce and many of his hymn tunes are no longer sung, although folk musicians are rediscovering his collections of Sea Shanties, the piano accompaniments of which are direct precursors to those of Britten in his folk song settings – both composers wishing to remove themselves from some of the heavier piano styles previously accepted.

During his lifetime however, Terry did little to disabuse people with regard to his own education, qualifications and appointments in the early part of his career. For example, he was at Highgate School as Director of Music but in fact, he held this temporary position for only four months after the sudden death of the previous postholder and was not offered the permanent position.

Unfortunately, there is also a somewhat negative side to Richard Runciman Terry’s character, particularly in his dealings with some festival competitors and groups of amateur musicians. Contemporary newspaper reports as well as The Musical Times evidence cases of Terry’s dismissive and discouraging adjudications which often had devastating effects on young and even established amateur musicians. It remains unclear what might have prompted this waspish style of criticism and who – if anybody – was going to benefit from it, even given the mores of the time.

Further research also exposes inconsistencies that all taken together create a false impression of the man.  Biographical focus to date has been on the persona of Terry as the discoverer and promoter of polyphonic church music and this detracts from his own substantial musicality and number of worthy compositions.

1947 Biographical Sketch and Review

There was a short biography of Terry from 1947. It was called “Westminster Retrospect” and was written by Hilda Andrews. It ran to nine editions between 1947 and 1948 and it is likely that this proved to be the main source available to students for subsequent research.

At the time of its publication, the Roman Catholic journal, ‘The Tablet’ published a review of this work. The review was by Anthony Gregory Murray (27 February 1905 – 19 January 1995). Here it is:

Page 10 The Tablet 1st May 1948
THE WESTMINSTER CHOIR Westminster Retrospect : A Memoir of Sir Richard Terry. By HILDA ANDREWS. Oxford University Press. 12s. 6d.

“I can hardly imagine a less grateful task than the reviewing of this book. From inside knowledge of the Westminster Cathedral choir from 1914 to 1920, and from many long discussions I had with Terry then and later, and an intermittent correspondence maintained almost up to the time of his death, I was able to form a very complete picture of him, both as a man and as a musician.

With this picture in my mind, I must confess to considerable surprise at much that Miss Andrews has to say. One thing at least is obvious : for her account of the Westminster days she has had to depend very largely on the random reminiscences of those who see the past through coloured spectacles : an object-lesson in the unreality of the evidence of contemporaries which is not really contemporary**.

When there are genuinely contemporary records to guide her, such as the Cathedral music-lists, she is on firmer ground. She thus establishes beyond doubt the double thesis that the repertory of the Cathedral choir was enormous and that Terry must be credited with the lion’s share in rescuing our Tudor church music from oblivion.

With a choir consisting of men who were always good sight-readers and of boys who were always good followers of their one or two reliable leaders, he would time and again achieve remarkable results in the performance of works which had been under-rehearsed or not rehearsed at all. That was where his true greatness lay.

He was not a scholar in any real sense of the word — in my opinion he could not rival H. B. Collins as a polyphonic editor — but he was an incomparable demonstrator, passionately convinced, and passionately intent on convincing others, that this forgotten polyphony was our greatest musical heritage from the past.

Yet, although his repertory was prodigious, we who were in his choir know only too well that the standard of performance often left much to be desired. He covered too much ground to allow time for adequate rehearsal, and he grew increasingly careless once his reputation was established.

Terry’s early preference for polyphony over plainsong, to which Miss Andrews refers (p. 74), endured to the end. Despite his public praises of plainsong, he was too deeply engrossed in his other pursuits to study the subject as it deserves. It is therefore quite absurd to say that “he knew all there was to know” (p. 67) ; nor can I allow to pass unchallenged the statement that he interpreted it according to “an individual application of the principles of Solesmes” (p. 69). In so far as “Terry’s plainsong is dead” (p. 71) we have suffered no great loss.

By the time I entered the choir school, Terry had ceased to give his full attention to the vocal training of his trebles. The all-pervading “oo” (which ultimately degenerated into a permanent hoot) was said to be necessary owing to the vastness of the cathedral, in which no one could reasonably expect to hear words. The fallacy of this was convincingly demonstrated when Terry conducted the first performance of Vaughan Williams’s Mass in March, 1923, with the collaboration of Fr. Driscoll’s choir from Wimbledon. On that occasion discerning listeners perceived that the Wimbledon trebles were altogether on a higher level of excellence in every respect, especially in purity of tone and diction. Miss Andrews mentions this first performance, but makes no reference to Fr. Driscoll’s choir (p. 134). In the same paragraph she leaves the unsuspecting reader to infer that it was Terry who conducted a subsequent performance of the Mass at Queen’s Hall.

In fact the book is quite remarkable both for its omissions and its misleading statements, too numerous to list. There is no reference, for instance, to the enormous debt Terry owed to his various assistants, without whose devoted services there might have been a very different tale to tell : Fr. Vernon Russell and Mr. P. J. Collis are only two of the many names that spring to mind.

From the many misleading statements I select this :
“His (Terry’s) Fellowship of the Royal College of Organists was a diploma gained in the dim past which counted to him for nothing in his later life. But he had a great gift for improvisation” (p. 175). The truth is that Terry’s “F.R.C.O.” (like his Doctorate) was granted to him honoris causa after he had already been for some years at Westminster. We never heard him play any organ piece, either from music or from memory, and his improvisation was full of mid-Victorian platitudes, strangely inconsistent with the plainsong and polyphony that surrounded it and altogether unexpected from one who was said to have steeped himself in the modes. Terry was certainly no organist and he certainly did not have an “amazing gift for improvisation” (p. 176).

If Miss Andrews’s memoir were deserving of more extended treatment, countless other examples could be given of its inaccuracy. But we could have forgiven inaccuracy of detail if the main lines of the book had presented a true picture. Clearly Miss Andrews has had inadequate material at her disposal and has therefore had to make too many guesses ; only those of us who worked with and under Terry in his Westminster days can see how wrong her perspective so often is.

I shall not be alone in hoping that her memoir is not passed down to posterity as an authentic guide to future historians. A. GREGORY MURRAY.”

(**In fact, Terry may well have been known to Hilda Andrews Mus. Bac. – she had edited William Byrd’s “My Lady Nevells Booke” (1591) with an Introduction and Notes. Terry had written a preface for this edition, published by J. Curwen and Sons Ltd., London, 1926)

Terry’s Family and Corrections to dates etc.

Some information about Terry’s family follows below, along with corrections to inconsistencies that appear frequently in references to his life’s dates (Terry was not born in 1865), education and career, so the following extracts are from contemporary newspaper articles and censuses (with reference numbers and dates):

Date of Birth; Date of Baptism

Richard Terry: born 3rd January 1864, Northumberland, England
Richard Runciman Terry Born 1st qr 1864

Name: Richard Runciman Terry
Gender: Male
Baptism Date: 31 Jan 1864
Baptism Place: Cresswell, Northumberland, England
Father: Thomas Terry
Mother: Marian Terry
FHL Film Number: 1564658
Reference ID: item 6 p 32

[Terry’s birth actually made a notice in the national press of the time, as the following extract shows: “Western Daily Press – Friday 12 February 1864 – A Printer’s Error – A ludicrous blunder appears in a Ripon paper (The Ripon and Richmond Chronicle), caused by a line which properly belonged to a meeting report having been accidentally placed between two announcements of birth. The record read as follows: – “On the 3rd instant, at Ellington, the wife of Mr Terry, schoolmaster, of a son. He spoke indistinctly, but was understood to say that on the 5th instant at Bond Gate, Ripon, the wife of Mr Joseph Lonsdale, tailor, of a daughter.”]

1871 Census:
Name: Richard R Terry
Age: 7
Estimated birth year: abt 1864
Relation: Son (Child)
Father’s name: Thomas Terry
Mother’s name: Marion J B Terry
Gender: Male
Where born: Woodhorn, Northumberland, England
Civil Parish: Hauxley
Ecclesiastical parish: Amble and Hauxley
Town: Hauxley
County/Island: Northumberland
Country: England
Registration district: Alnwick
Sub-registration district: Warkworth
ED, institution, or vessel: 9
Household schedule number: 48
Piece: 5171
Folio: 9
Page Number: 12
Household Members:
Name                      Age
Thomas Terry        34
Marion J B Terry   33
Richard R Terry       7
Walter R Terry         1
Jean F Terry             5
Jessie Hodgson       4
Hannah Morris     16

1881 Census (Transcription Errors appear in the site with this information)
Name: Richard Ferry [Richard Terry]
Age: 17
Estimated birth year: abt 1864
Relationship to Head: Nephew
Gender: Male
Where born: Ellington, Northumberland, England
Civil Parish: Westoe
County/Island: Durham
Country: England
Street address: 36 Albermarle St
Education:
Employment status:
Occupation: Pupil Teacher
Registration district: South Shields
Sub registration district: Westoe
ED, institution, or vessel: 16
Neighbours:
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Piece: 5013
Folio: 81
Page Number: 20
Household Members:
Name              Age
Catherine Watt    25
Margaret Watt     66
Richard Ferry      17 (Terry)

1891 Census:
Name: Richard Runciman Terry
Age: 25
Estimated birth year: abt 1866
Relation: Officer (Military)
Gender: Male
Where born: Ellington, Northamptonshire, England [Ellington, Northumberland, England]
Civil Parish: Kempston
Ecclesiastical parish: Kempston
County/Island: Bedfordshire
Country: England
Street address:
Occupation: School Master, Teacher of Music, Organist and School Choir Master
Condition as to marriage: S
Education:
Employment status: Employed
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Registration district: Bedford
ED, institution, or vessel: Bedford County School
Neighbours:
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Piece: 1250
Folio: 166
Page Number: 1
Household Members:
Name                                       Age
Richard Runciman Terry     25
Note: Terry was not Director of Music at Elstow School, rather he was at Bedford County School. Here are the facts: Elstow School (closed 1916 formerly Bedfordshire Middle Class Public School established 1867, then known from 1875 as Bedford County School then from 1907 as  Elstow School).

Terry in 1881:

While Terry was studying to be a pupil teacher, he passed the external examination in the “History of the Puritan Revolution” at South Shields, gaining a second class pass. This was a course of study provided by what was known at that time as the Durham University extension – an extra-mural class. (Evidence from Shields Daily Gazette and Shipping Telegraph, 27 January 1881).

Shields Daily News, 5 November 1881
ST. HILDA’S CHURCH YOUNG MEN’S INSTITUTE. – The weekly meeting of the Debating Society in connection with the above institute was held last night. Mr W. E. R. Youlton occupied the chair, and there was a good attendance of members. An essay was read by Mr Richard Terry, entitled “The Rebellion of 1688”. A debate in which several of the members took part followed the reading of the paper. The meeting terminated with votes of thanks to Mr Terry for his interesting paper, and to Mr Youlton for presiding.

Terry in 1890:

The Cambridge Independent Press – 28 June 1890
Police Intelligence –
A STUDENT SUMMONED,
Richard Terry (25), a student of King’s College, was summoned for riding a bicycle without having a lamp attached, at 10 p.m., at Milton, on the 14th inst. – The defendant pleaded guilty. – P.c. John Mauning moved the case, and said that when he stopped the defendant he said he was under the impression that a light was only necessary in a town.  – The bench inflicted a fine of 6l (£6 – but this seems very steep? should it have read 6/- or 6 shillings? and costs. Whichever it is, the fine and costs equate to a sizeable amount in today’s values.)

Terry in 1895:

Huddersfield Chronicle – Wednesday 5 June 1895
THE BANKRUPTCY ACTS, 1883 AND 1890.
RECEIVING ORDERS
(By telegraph from last night’s London Gazette.)
Richard Runciman Terry, St. John’s, Leatherhead, Surrey, formerly St. Edward’s Passage, Cambridge, schoolmaster

1901 Census:
Name: Richard R Teory [Richard R Terry]
Age: 33
Estimated birth year: abt 1868
Relation to Head: Lodger
Gender: Male
Birth Place: Morpeth, Northumberland, England
Civil Parish: Midsomer Norton
Ecclesiastical parish: Christchurch Downside
County/Island: Somerset
Country: England
Street address:
Occupation:
Condition as to marriage:
Education:
Employment status:
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Registration district: Clutton
Sub-registration district: Midsomer Norton
ED, institution, or vessel: 6
Neighbours:
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Piece: 2332
Folio: 114
Page Number: 5
Household schedule number: 34
Household Members:
Name                            Age
Mary A Hart                 64
Maud M Richardson  35
Ellen R Hart                30
Alice J Hart                  28
Richard B Haygarth    32
Richard R Teory          33 [Terry]

On his death in 1938, the following was published [Alumni Cantabrigienses: A Biographical List of All Known Students …, Volume 2 Page 142] (with mistakes including date of birth, father’s place of birth, places of employment. The entry also gives the impression that Terry was a Fellow of the Royal College of Organists which he was not):

Name: Richard Runciman Terry
College: KING’S
Entered: Michs. 1887
BORN: 1865 [Terry was born 3 January 1864]
Died: 18 Apr 1938
More Information:
Adm. at KING’S, Apr. 26, 1889; a choral scholar. Had matric. Non-Coll. at Oxford, Michs. 1887. [Eld. s. of Thomas, of Newcastle-on-Tyne [Thomas Terry, (Terry’s father) was actually born in Richmond, Yorkshire]
B. 1865, at Ellington.] Matric. Easter, 1889.
Hon. Mus.Doc., Durham. F.R.C.O. [Terry’s F.R.C.O. was also bestowed honorarily so should read Hon. F.R.C.O.]
Organist at Elstow School [see above]. Organist and choirmaster of St John’s Cathedral, Antigua, West Indies, 1892-5. Joined the Roman Catholic Church, 1896. Organist and choirmaster at Downside Abbey (and at Downside School), 1896-1901; organist and choir director of Westminster Cathedral, 1901-24. Knighted, 1922. Published Church music, specialising in that of the 16th century; also composed many musical works. Of Haddon House, Woodstock, in 1927. Married, 1909, Mary Lee, dau. of Jasper Stephenson, of Blanchland, Northumberland, and had issue. Died Apr. 18, 1938, in London. (King’s Coll. Reg.; Who was Who; The Times, Apr. 19, 1938.)

[On Terry’s Honorary F.R.C.O.,: In an off-the-record conversation, the late Anthony Caldicott of the Karg-Elert Archive expressed an opinion that Terry was awarded an Honorary Fellowship of the Royal College of Organists on account of the fact that he had been appointed to Westminster Cathedral without having any qualifications. At that time, it was not possible to be appointed cathedral organist without the fellowship and the award of the honorary fellowship by the Royal College of Organists obviated this.]

Name: Richard R Terry
Birth Date: abt 1864
Date of Registration: Jun 1938
Age at Death: 74
Registration district: Kensington
Inferred County: London
Volume: 1a
Page: 107

From the Probate Registry:
Name: Richard Runciman Terry
Probate Date: 26 Jul 1938
Death Date: 18 Apr 1938
Death Place: London, England
Registry: London, England

TERRY sir Richard Runciman knight of 87 Prince of Wales-mansions
Prince of Wales-road Battersea London S.W.11 died 18 April 1938
at Princess Beatrice Hospital Richmond-road Earls Court
London S.W.5 Probate London 26 July to Adrian Morgan Squire
engineer and Harold Robinson solicitor. Effects £2021 10s.8d.

Highgate School:
As verified by Highgate School, 31 September 2016
“…confirm(ation) that Richard Runciman Terry taught at Highgate School from September 1895 to December 1895” (four months).

The Influence of Father J. Egbert Turner O.S.B. (1853-1897)

“Fr. J E Turner OSB was curate at St. Mary’s from 1891-93. A gifted organist, singer and composer, he composed 4 Masses and numerous motets, which are still in print today. His Mass in honour of St. Cecilia was premiered at St. Mary’s at High Mass on Sunday 28 August 1892. Unlike many Churches at this time, St. Mary’s maintained a tradition of performing Plainchant and Renaissance polyphonic music. Fr. Turner, along with Sir R R Terry, Organist at Westminster Cathedral, was instrumental in the revival of the traditional chants of the church, as well as polyphonic masters such as Palestrina, Byrd and Lassus.” http://www.musicstmarys.org/#!schola/crrl

Terry in 1897:

Western Daily Press – Monday 6 December 1897
At Downside (Benedictine) College, a performance was given on Mendelssohn’s “Lauda Sion,” the accompaniments being rendered by piano and harmonium (Windeyer Clark’s arrangement), in the absence of a complete orchestra. A miscellaneous concert followed, in which the school band played movemets by Gounod, Ames, Dolmetsch, and Purcell, and the school choir sang compositions by Pergolesi, Mendelssohn, Gibbons, Beale, Stanford, C. H. Lloyd, and Reinecke. Solos by the following composers were also included:- Wagner, Stanford, Wieniawski, and Bohm. Mr. R. R. Terry conducted.

Terry in 1898:

Bristol Mercury – Saturday 26 February 1898
On Monday a capital programme of Shrovetide theatricals was rendered at St. Gregory’s College. It consisted of “Cox and Box” by F. C. Burnand and Sir Arthur Sullivan, and “Crazed,” a musical absurdity in one act by A. R. Philips…Both went of extremely well. The audience consisted of the community, the boys and servants, with a few visitors who happened to be there. The pieces were brought out under Mr R. R. Terry’s direction.

Bristol Mercury – Friday 3 June 1898
On Tuesday evening the members of the Downside College Choir gave a dramatic and musical entertainment in aid of the Paulton Memorial Hospital at the Drill Hall, Midsomer Norton, to a highly intelligent and appreciative audience. The scenery and staging were excellent, and Mr R. R. Terry, the musical director at the College, who was responsible for the arrangements, is to be heartily congratulated on the exceedingly successful entertainment. There was a good attendance, Mrs John Thatcher rendered most efficient service as accompanist at the pianoforte, and Mr R. R. Terry conducted. The first part of the programme, consisting of vocal selections, opened with Barnby’s part song, “A Wife’s Song” by the choir, followed by the madrigal “Come, let us join the roundelay” (Beale). The numbers were warmly applauded. Sullivan’s chorus “The Beleaguered” was well rendered, as was also the chorus “Gipsy Life” (Schumann). The “Shepherd’s Cradle Song” (Somervell) by the trebles in unison, evoked most complimentary plaudits. Master G. Williams gave a very sweet rendering of the song “The Wild Rose” by the conductor, for which he was deservedly encored. The Rev. H. W. New, O.S.B., (the rector of the College), who possesses a highly cultivated voice, was recalled for his “Blow, thou winter wind” (Sargent). Part II consisted of “Cox and Box; or, the Long Lost Brothers,” a burlesque by F. C. Burnand of Maddison Morton’s fare of “Box and Cox”, the music being by Sir Arthur Sullivan…The entertainment concluded with A.R. Philips’s musical absurdity “Crazed”…The piece was a great success. Before the audience left the Rev. W. T. Bull thanked the Prior of St. Gregory’s College, Downside, and all who had contributed to the very successful entertainment.

Terry in 1899:

Western Daily Press – Monday 5 June 1899
The festival of Corpus Christi was celebrated on Thursday last at St. Gregory’s College with the customary pageantry…Mr Terry ably presided at the organ. At the conclusion of the mass an imposing procession was formed.

Bristol Mercury – Monday 24 July 1899
PRIZE DAY AT DOWNSIDE COLLEGE
The Monastery of St. Gregory’s, Downside…was founded by Dom. Sidgbert Buckley, one of the Monks, the last, it is believed, of Westminster, in the year 1605. It is thus approaching the completion of the third century of its history, and it is on this account that Pope Leo XIII on June 29th…by a special Bull, created the monastery an abbey, and it will henceforth bear the designation of “St. Gregory’s Abbey.”…The proceedings opened with a concert, at which for about an hour and a half selections of Old English music of the 15th and 16th centuries from the pens of William Byrd and Henry Purcell were finely interpreted by the choir, ably conducted by the musical director of the college, Mr R. Terry.

Pall Mall Gazette – Friday 8 December 1899
The revival of the church music for which the old composers of England itself were responsible is a thing devoutly to be desired. Before the time of Purcell, the greatest of all our composers, there were many musicians of splendid capacity and splendid inspiration producing their serious ecclesiastical music in this country. Among these was William Byrd, one of whose masses was publicly performed at Ealing the other day by the Downside Choir on the occasion of the opening of a new Roman Catholic Church. Mr. R. Terry and Mr. W. Barclay Squire (of the British Museum) are responsible for the new edition of the mass; and the performance was eminently interesting for more than its own sake. It was interesting as indicative of the extraordinary power and accomplishment which so long ago distinguished this one master of that great English school, whose lot in recent days has been a most curious neglect.

William Byrd, then, thus suddenly brought forward to the light of public recognition, appears as the master of a lofty musical expression, and as the possessor of a magnificent musical emotion that belong to the very best things of musical art. His freedom, his breadth, his splendid liberality, are noticeable at all times and the fine vitality of his melody, the almost contemptuous self-confidence of his harmony, are points in which to take  a keen and profound delight. The pedant of a later day may complain, if he chooses, that he does not find in Byrd the smooth and polished effects which a later elaboration of contrapuntal convention made almost imperative upon any writer of music. It is for that reason, as we suspect, that Byrd and his contemporaries, even Purcell himself, have had to endure a wave of oblivion.

A comparison is to hand. In the eighteenth century heyday of the heroic couplet, the person who could turn out smooth, antithetical lines was regarded as a man of culture, where artists in words, like Jonson, Chapman, Shakspeare (sic) himself, were looked upon even with a certain contempt, as being in some sense great writers in the rough. So the more purely conventional musician of a day later than Purcell imposed his highly polished electro-plate upon a world slow to recognize the beauty of a more precious metal. Byrd naturally encountered neglect; and it is only to-day, when the war against conventional pedantry has been waged with something line a satisfactory success, that it seems at all possible to restore these fine old masters to a place which is theirs by right. We understand that Downside is making a genuinely serious effort towards such a restoration; and this is a movement which has our warmest and heartiest sympathies.

Shepton Mallet Journal – Friday 15 December 1899
THE BENEDICTINE CHURCH AT EALING, W. –
The small portion of the new church of St. Benedict, Ealing, which has been at present built, was opened for public worship on Sunday November 26th…the church and parish are in charge of Benedictine monks belonging to Downside Abbey…The Mass was beautifully sung by the choir of Downside, to Byrde’s (sic) Mass for five voices, one of the finest masses of the English School of Music of the sixteenth century, and indeed one of the finest masses ever composed. Such music rendered in such a way is heard in few indeed of our churches. The singing was unaccompanied, and its effect was intensely devotional. It was the ideal of what church music ought to be. Palestrina’s Tu es Petrus was sung at the offertory, and the plainchant of the Introit, Gradual, Offertory, Communion and other parts of the mass was beautifully rendered. Not one of the least beautiful things was the singing of the Epistle and Gospel to the magnificent Benedictine tones…The music in the evening included the traditional Benedictine Salve Regina, Philip’s Hodie Sanctus Benedictus, and Palestrina’s O Salutaris and Tantum Ergo. Respecting the music of the day, the “Saturday Review,” in an article, proves it to be one of the finest pieces of purely English music ever written.

Western Daily Press – Monday 25 December 1899
The “Mass of St. Gregory,” for unaccompanied use during Lent and Advent, to which is added a “Gloria in Excelsis,” and an accompaniment for the benefit of such choirs as may desire to sing the Mass at other ecclesiastical seasons of the year. is the composition of Mr. R.R. Terry, who has inscribed it to the Very Rev. H.E. Ford, O.S.B., Prior of Downside. The work, which has been published by Messrs. Cary and Co., Oxford Circus Avenue, W., is impressive, and should prove acceptable at the present period.

Terry in 1900:

Not everything met with universal acclaim however as this notice from the Leeds Mercury, Tuesday 2 October 1900 demonstrates. Under the heading of “Birmingham Musical Festival Rehearsals”, final rehearsals for Bach and Brahms (represented respectively by the St. Matthew Passion and A German Requiem) introduce this notice from ‘Our Own Correspondent’ who writes: “The last work to meet with attention yesterday was Byrd’s Mass, or rather a selection from the same, which Mr. Barclay Squire and Mr. Richard Terry have jointly edited. It is music of a severe but impressive type that will abundantly test the ability of the Birmingham choralists to maintain the pitch. Mr. Perkins did something to relieve the strain yesterday by occasionally improving (sic) an interlude between the movements. The soloists in this revival of an old and all but forgotten work were Miss Evangeline Florence, Miss Crossley, Mr Ben Davies, Mr Wm. Green, and Mr. David Bispham…Today the festival opens with a time-honoured performance of “Elijah.”

The report of the concert from “The Morning Post” of 6 October 1900 says the following: (after a good notice for the Brahms’ Requiem). “Part the second commenced with four movements from one of three masses written by William Byrd. Manuscript copies of the first, for three voices exist in the British Museum and Fitzwilliam Library of the second a four, there are no extant copies, and only one of the Mass (illegible word) selected for performance on this occasion. The movements for soli and chorus were the “Credo,” “Sanctus,” “Benedictus,” and “Agnus Dei,” and the quaint old-world music sounded strange in a festival programme, and all the more so since it came between two such modern works as the Brahms Requiem and the “Parsifal” Prelude. It was interesting to hear, though we could not help feeling that the place for music of this kind is a cathedral, and that the best interpreters are cathedral singers. The soloists were Miss Evangeline Florence, Miss Ada Crossley, and Messrs. Ben Davies, W. Greening and D. Bispham, and though they sang well, their voices did not form a perfect blend, The tempo was also good, yet the marks of expression were not always observed. A certain fall in the pitch was not surprising. A score of the mass was produced by the Musical Antiquarian Society of London in 1841; the more authoritative edition used on the present occasion was one by Messrs. W. Barclay Squire and Richard Terry.”

Terry in 1901:

Western Daily Press – Monday 2 December 1901
Byrd’s Mass for Three Voices, which dates back to the 16th century, was sung yesterday for the first time in London at the High Mass at the Oratory, Brompton. The Mass has been lost since Bartleman’s sale in 1822, but a MS, in Immyn’s(?) handwriting was found in the British Museum, and as edited by Mr. Barclay Squire it has been published as No. 1 of the Arundel Masses, selected by Henry Duke of Norfolk and C. T. Gatty. It was first revived by Mr. Terry, at Downside Abbey.

Terry in 1911:

Diss Express – Friday 7 July 1911
Durham University conferred…the honorary degree of Doctor of Music upon Mr. Richard Runciman Terry, organist of the Roman Catholic Cathedral, Westminster. [Terry was proposed for the degree of Mus. Doc. honoris causa by W H Hadow]. “Dr Hadow’s Tribute:
Presenting him at Durham University for the degree of Doctor of Music in 1911, Principal Hadow characterised Dr Terry as “a musician of great learning, of fine scholarship, and of impeccable taste…” When he began his research work, most of the forgotten masterpieces existed chiefly in manuscript collections, but he has succeeded in rescuing them from the oblivion with which they were threatened, and thus has earned the grateful recognition of all who care for the dignity and renown of English music.

Dr Terry’s (original) music works include six Masses, many motets, services, incidental Church music, two light operas, and the choral and incidental music to Sophocles’ “Antigone.” Of the old masters, Purcell, Byrd, Tallis, Tye, and others he has written and edited extensively.”

Terry in 1912:

The Scotsman – Thursday 28 November 1912
MUSICAL PUBLICATIONS
LONGMANS, GREEN & CO.
– Under the title Old Rhymes with New Tunes, Messrs. Longmans, Green, & Co. send out an illustrated book (2s, 6d. net) of music for children in which Mr Richard Runciman Terry with considerable art and ingenuity gives new musical settings to Georgie Porgie, Little Miss Muffet, Hey Diddle-Diddle, and other nursery favourites. The illustrations by Gabriel Pippet are suggestive of the humours of the verses and music.

Terry in 1917:

Newcastle Journal – Monday 15 January 1917
IN THE PUBLIC EYE

SKETCHES OF NOTABILITIES IN THE NORTH

MR R. R. TERRY, MUS.DOC
– Dr. Richard Runciman Terry, who is due to lecture at the Newcastle Literary and Philosophical Society to-night will find himself on his native heath, for he is the eldest son of the late Mr Thomas Terry, of Newcastle, and a nephew of Sir Walter Runciman, Bart., M.P. The subject of his lecture will be “Sea Songs and Chanties,” a subject upon which he is peculiarly well qualified to speak, for practically the whole of the doctor’s life has been devoted to the youngest of the arts.

Educated at Oxford and King’s College, Cambridge, Dr. Terry early won a Choral Scholarship at the latter institution. He threw himself with characteristic ardour and intelligence into the domain of University Music, became a prominent member of the committee of the Univeristy Musical Society, and founded the Cambridge University Musical Club for the study and practice of Chamber music.

Westminster Cathedral Organist
– On leaving the University he held successively posts as organist and choirmaster at Bedford County School, St. John’s Cathedral Antigua, and Downside Abbey  – the Benedictine Monastery and College near Bath. In 1901 he was appointed to his present post as organist and musical director of Westminster Cathedral, a position which he has never ceased to fill with distinction. Dr Terry received his first lessons in organ and harmony from Mr G. A. Higge, F.R.C.O., the Tallis Gold Medallist of Trinity College, and subsequently he studied counterpoint and composition under Dr. Charles Chambers of this city.

Dr. Terry’s musical work has embraced a wide field. He has been a prolific composer, writer, critic, and lecturer, but probably his most valuable contribution to the art has been his research work. As the result of this, we have now a wider knowledge of those great composers through whom, from the beginning of Henry VIII’s reign to the end of the Elizabethan age, England claimed with justice the musical supremacy of Europe. To this end, Dr Terry has brought under contribution his talent, his industry, and his scholarship.

Tudor Church Music: Terry’s Appointment as Editor and Subsequent Resignation

For the most detailed, accurate and most balanced view on Terry’s behaviour and attitude during his time as Editor of “Tudor Church Music”, you are recommended to read “An affair of honour: ‘Tudor Church Music,’ the ousting of Richard Terry, and a trust vindicated” Music & Letters | November 01, 1995 | Turbet, Richard |

Terry in 1922:

Aberdeen Journal – Saturday 11 November 1922
Honours List
Knights
Dr WALFORD DAVIES – For services to music. Professor of Music, University College of Wales, Aberystwyth
Dr RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY -, organist and director of music, Westminster Cathedral, since 1901. For research work in early English manuscripts in music.

Resignation from Westminster Cathedral

In a fairly recent newspaper article, Colin Mawby referred to Terry’s having been given notice to leave Westminster Cathedral apparently for having sworn at the choir.

Terry in 1925:

Berwickshire News and General Advertiser – Tuesday 24 November 1925
FROM NORTHUMBERLAND TO DUNBAR FOR A WIFE
Sir Richard Runciman Terry, who is to succeed Mr J.B. Clark, as Chairman of Newcastle Centre of Trinity College of Music, will being to bear upon his duties the keen Northumberland sympathies of his predecessor, resigned for reasons of health. Sir Richard, himself the son of a Newcastle man (Thos. Terry) who went across the Border for his bride, Miss Marion Ballard Runciman, of Dunbar, and so became connected with well-known Runciman family of North Northumberland (Shoreston and Doxford).

Terry in 1927:

Aberdeen Journal – Thursday 1 December 1927
LYRICS SET TO MUSIC
No nursery is complete without its occasional sing-song, and simple yet pretty songs for the kiddies are few and far between. Richard Runciman Terry’s songs are excellent for children, and this year a new volume is issued, “Still More Old Rhymes with New Tunes” (Longmans: 3s 6d). Sixteen songs make up this dainty volume, which is tastefully illustrated by Gabriel Pippet. The verses will be known to many, but the tunes are new, dainty and yet simple in melody and accompaniment.

Terry Interviewed in 1930:

Dundee Courier – Monday 20 January 1930

Sir Richard Terry on Jazz

Famous musician in Dundee

Great Singers Who Live on Their Reputation

Specially Contributed

From somewhere in the hotel came an unresponsive chord, plucked ruthlessly from a reluctant piano. It was the grim herald of a too popular song. It came from a room where children were having a party. That chord suggested a subject. “What do you think of jazz?” I asked. Sir Richard Terry smiled before replying. “It’s jolly fine stuff for dancing to, isn’t it?” he said.

Sir Richard is at present in Dundee in the capacity of examiner of Trinity College, London. When I interviewed him he had had a busy day examining candidates.

“Do you consider that jazz is really music?” I asked. “Some of it,” said Sir Richard “is exceedingly clever.”

At Peace with Jazz

Clearly, this would not do. The man who rediscovered the music of the English composers of the 16th century was actually at peace with jazz. I rallied my broken squares. I hurled another question into the breach. “What is wrong with jazz music?” I asked. “It has become too important,” said Sir Richard. “The music of our best composers is clever and good. But we have too much of it (jazz). It is only a case of putting the accent in the wrong place. Anybody can do it once they learn the trick. I know a town in England,” continued Sir Richard smiling, “where people in cinemas and theatres and hotels play jazz six days a week. Then on Sundays, they meet together and play Beethoven’s symphonies because they like them.” I brought out my notebook. I raised my pencil expectantly. “What was the name of that town?” I asked. “That I cannot tell you,” he said. “They might not thank me for butting in on their pleasure.”

Puzzling Subject

Sadly I put away my notebook. I inquired about a subject which has often puzzled me. Sir Richard leaned further back in his chair and crossed his legs. He had had a busy day.

“When a singer has made his or her mark in this country we are very kind to him or her ever after,” he said. “There comes a time when their voices succumb to Anno Domini. Now, in Italy they are ruthless with such a singer. But we are kind to them for the rest of their natural lives – long after their voices are gone. We are less critical and more kind-hearted. If a singer once makes a reputation in this country he keeps it for all eternity and can sing as well or as badly as he chooses.”

“Does a name, then, count for too much?” I asked. “Rather would I have people worship a star,” he replied, “than pay tribute to boosted mediocrity. After all, a celebrity (however ancient) has once deserved his reputation, but no amount of boosting – by interested cliques – will ever make mediocrity into a front rank artiste.”

Operatic Stars

Sir Richard leaned forward in his chair and spoke of opera – of the great singers of the past and the great singers of the past and the great singers of the present. With a sweep of his hand I was in Milan listening to notes of ravishing beauty from the throat of a famous soprano. By some magic, the walls of the room became tiers of listening people; the coal fire gleamed like a footlight. The evening paper in my hand was now a programme. “I have great hopes of the Beecham scheme,” said Sir Richard at length. “Sir Thomas is the only man to whom we can look to-day to do anything for opera in this country.

“It is no use looking to the musical profession as such. As Charles Manners (director of the Moody-Manners Opera Company) once said, “A lot of people think they can produce opera when they don’t even know the price of a pair of tights. The capacity to enjoy opera is as great in this country as any other. Unfortunately, we are only able to get it as a special treat. Until we get into the habit of taking is as naturally as bread and cheese, it will remain exotic. Have a cigarette.”

Golden Age

In the blue smoke of our cigarettes Sir Richard spoke about Caruso and radio and the sixteenth century composers, on whom he is the leading authority. “That was the Golden Age of England’s music,” he said. “In those days we were producing as fine music as any other country in Europe. Of great performers with second-rate repertoires – the virtuoso who sings “Just a Song at Twilight,” for instance – Sir Richard had something to say. “There is no reason,” he remarked, “why people should put up with second-rate music because it is performed in a first-rate manner.”

I was about to leave when I noticed that Sir Richard was looking somewhat surprised. I remembered, and asked the usual question.

“Do you think the Scots are a musical race?” Sir Richard smiled. He had been expecting this. “Of course they are,” he said. “A very musical race. As a quondam adjudicator at Dundee Musical Festival I must say that I have noticed a very marked improvement in the standard of performance during the comparatively short period of its existence.”

As I left the hotel I heard another popular foxtrot being coaxed out of the piano. The party was still going on. But it did not trouble me. After all, was it not a really fine thing to dance to?

1932:

Hull Daily Mail – Saturday 2 January 1932
DIED IN CHAIR Sudden End of Lady Terry. Lady Terry, the wife of Sir Richard Runciman Terry, the well-known music composer, and for 23 years organist at Westminster Cathedral, was found dead at her home in Woodstock, Oxford, to-day. When a maid went into the kitchen about 6.30 a.m. she found her dead in a chair. Lady Terry had played a prominent part in the public life of Woodstock, and was particularly interested in work among women. She married Sir Richard (then Mr) Terry in 1909.

Lincolnshire Echo – Monday 4 January 1932
LADY TERRY’S SUICIDE
A verdict of “Suicide during temporary insanity” was returned at the inquest, today, on Lady Terry, wife of Sir Richard Runciman Terry who was found dead sitting in a chair in the kitchen of her home on Saturday. [Terry was estranged from his wife for some years].

Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette – Saturday 9 January 1932
Sir Richard Terry and Downside Sir Richard Terry, whose wife died under tragic circumstances on Saturday, was for about five years associated with Downside School. He went to the school as music master, also directing the choir. Sir Richard, when at Downside, established the tradition of mediaeval music, in which direction his researches and work were of outstanding musical interest. Sir Richard’s official capacity at Downside provided an opportunity of giving public production to the result of his labours. Sir Richard also produced the Alcestis of Euripides.

1938:

Gloucestershire Echo – Tuesday 19 April 1938
DEATH OF SIR RICHARD TERRY – STERN CRITIC OF JAZZ AND CROONERS –
Sir Richard Terry, famous composer, organist and scholar, who brought about a reformation in English Church music and who held an uncompromising hostility to jazz, died last night after a short illness at St. Beatrice’s Hospital, Fulham, aged 73* (* incorrect – Terry was born 3 January 1864)

His death removes one whose years of painstaking work have made an indelible impression on church music. He set a standard for the country which has been acknowledge (sic) with gratitude by lovers of church music.

Sir Richard died three months after returning from a strenuous tour during which he made a comprehensive study of music in Australia.

Organist and director of music at Westminster Cathedral from 1901 to 1924, Sir Richard Runciman Terry was best known by his great work of restoring plainsong and the old polyphonic music to the Catholic Church services.

After his retirement from Westminster Cathedral in 1924 he devoted himself to antiquarian musical research work, especially English instrumental music of the 16th and 17th centuries. His knowledge of sea shanties was unsurpassed. He delighted in sailors’ songs, and wrote a book entitled “The Shanty Book: Salt Sea Ballads.”

Knighted or his services to music in 1922, Terry adjudicated at many of the principal musical festivals.

Sir Richard’s comments on jazz were always of the harshest. “A crooner is not a singer, he is a disease,” he said once, addressing competitors in a boys’ musical festival. “You have you choice whether to grow up into a man or a crooner. You cannot be both.”

Sir Richard married in 1909 Mary, eldest daughter of Mr. Jasper Stephenson of Blanchland, Northumberland. She died in 1932. He leaves a son and a daughter.

Terry as an Adjudicator

That Terry spoke carelessly and harshly at festivals and eisteddfodau when adjudicating is also evident and a matter of public record. Several of his undiplomatic statements are to be found in various newspapers and journals of the era (1920s and 1930s).  Terry quite often appears to have forgotten that he was passing remarks and judgment on amateur musicians, overlooking the fact that he had once been one himself.

Fishguard Eisteddfod 1936; W. D. Clee and the Ystalyfera Mixed Choir

One example will stand: Terry’s harsh judgment of the Ystalyfera Mixed Choir (and by extension its conductor Mr William David Clee A.R.C.O., A.L.C.M.) at the 1936 Fishguard Eisteddfod showed Terry to be uncharitable. The effects of the result lasting for several years of which the loss of heart and broken spirit of both the choir and Mr W. D. Clee were by no means the least.

Terry and the BBC – 1920s

Terry broadcast on several occasions in the 1920s. Here are the programmes as they were recorded in the Radio Times. (Other broadcasts from the pioneer days of radio in England may yet come to light).

2LO London
Sunday 17 April 1927 19.45
A HYMN RECITAL
Arranged and Introduced by Sir RICHARD TERRY
The WIRELESS CHOIR,
Conducted by STANFORD ROBINSON

6LV Liverpool
Saturday 7 May 1927 21.20
COMMUNITY SINGING CONCERT
Organized by THE ‘DAILY EXPRESS’
Relayed from the Philharmonic Hall
ORCHESTRA of Forty-Five Performers conducted by Sir RICHARD TERRY
Soloists: JOHN GOSS and JOHN GARMER
(Negro Spirituels)

2LO London
Sunday 5 June 1927 20.00
A Programme of SCOTTISH METRICAL PSALMS
Arranged and introduced by SIR Richard TERRY
THE WIRELESS CHORUS
Chorus Master : STANFORD ROBINSON

2LO London
Friday 24 June 1927 19.45
SEA SHANTIES
Arranged and Introduced by Sir RICHARD TERRY

5WA Cardiff
Wednesday 19 June 1929 17.00
A Concert of Sea Shanties
Relayed from the Canton Secondary School for Boys
(Headmaster, J. ELWYK JAMES,)
Shantyman, W. MORGAN EVANS , Crew, THE SCHOOL (450 Voices)
Shanties :
IN the revival of interest in the old Sea Shanties
Sir Richard Terry has had a large share, and his arrangements are among the most popular, as they are among the most musicianly. As everybody knows, he has done distinguished work on behalf of church music, particularly during his long term of office at Westminster Cathedral. His researches in the realm of Sea Shanties have been more in the nature of a recreation, though he has carried out the task with the same enthusiasm which he gave to his more serious work.

Most of the Shanties are work tunes, intended to help the men in the old days of sail in carrying out the heavy tasks where ‘A long pull, a strong pull, and a pull all together’ was needed. But some of them deal rather with the off-duty side of a sailor’s life, and some are definitely shore songs. Many betray either an American origin or a sailorman’s intimate knowledge of the other side of the Atlantic. ‘Billy Boy,’ the first in this afternoon’s programme, is associated with the hard work around the capstan when the anchor was being raised. Billy has evidently been confessing to his mother that he has found a lady-love, and his mother puts him through a catechism as to whether the girl will make a good housekeeper.

Terry and the BBC – 1930s

Friday 16 May 1930 21.40
Closing Speeches by Sir RICHARD TERRY (the Adjudicator)
Dr. P. D. INNES (Chief Education Officer for
Birmingham)

1934 saw Terry’s involvement with the monumental BBC Radio Series “From Plainsong ot Purcell; The Foundations of English Music.” This series ran for four months. It is doubtful whether any of it survives in the archives.

Monday 17 September 1934 19.05
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir Richard Runciman Terry
Plainsong sung by a small choir:
1. Kyrie (De Angelis)
2. Kyrie (Rex Splendens)
3. Alleluia (for May 12)
4. Antiphon (Gloria tibi Trinitas)
5. Angelus ad Virginem
6. Sequence (Laetabundus)
7. Sequence (Victimae Paschali)
8. Sequence (Veni sancte Spiritus)
9. Sequence (Laude Sion)
10. Sequence (Dies irae)

In medieval times the present-day division of music into “sacred” and “secular” did not exist. Plainsong themes found their way into “worldly” compositions; carols ”which were then Folksongs pure and simple” found their way into church; Polyphonic masses and motets were written round “secular” tunes.

Musical histories are fond of pointing to the last-named practice as an “abuse” savouring of irreverence. We shall sing three examples of church music, popular in the time of Henry VIII, and if listeners can find any trace of “irreverence” in these three compositions, their ears must be strangely constructed.

We shall, further, feel rewarded if we can dispel some of the popular prejudices against Plainsong. Its two worst enemies are (a) its devotees and (b) the academics. The former would have us believe that every note is sacrosanct: the latter have overlaid it with so much technical jargon that the plain man cannot see the wood for the trees.

Don’t believe either of them, good listeners. Our forefathers were human beings like ourselves. Music which held human appeal for them cannot be devoid of interest for us. R.R.T.

Tuesday 18 September 1934 18.30
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Northumbrian Folk Songs sung by JOHN S. WARDLE and small male chorus:
1. The death of Parcy Reed 2. The brave Earl Brand
3 Hev ye seen owt o’ ma bonny lad? 4. Blow the winds I-ho
5. Johnny Armstrong’s last good-night
6. Oh soft blows the wind from the West
7. I drew my ship into a harbour 8. Here is the tender comin’ 9. Oh the bonny fisher lad
10. Liberty for the Sailors 11. Bobby Shafty 12. Andrew Carr

Wednesday 19 September 1934 19.05
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Early English Carols, sung by JOHN S. WARDALE , TAYLOR HARRIS , and small chorus:
I. There is no rose of such virtue 2. Pray for us the Prince of Peace 3. Nowel sing we
4. Nowel this is the salutacion 5. Make we joy now of this fest 6. Prallimus Cantantes
7. What tidings bringest thou, messenger ?
8. As I lay upon a night 9. A heavenly song
10. Now well may we mirthes make 11. This enders night 12. David ex progenie

Thursday 20 September 1934 18.30
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Part Music founded on Plainsong and Folksong sung by a small choir
(National Programme)

Friday 21 September 1934 19.10
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY

Monday 24 September 1934 19.05
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Tudor Church Music—I
Latin motets sung by a small choir

Last week we heard examples of Plainsong and Folksong (the latter including carols), together with a few compositions founded on both.
This week we trace the progress of English music from early examples (some of them rather crude) founded on some Plainsong tune to later ones When the composer gave free rein to his imagination.

We have included such later composers as Philips and Dering, although their Latin music was written after the Reformation. That of Philips was written for continental use as he fled abroad at the Reformation, settled on the continent and published all his music at Antwerp.
Dering also spent much time on the continent, finally returning to England as organist to the private chapel of Henrietta-wife of Charles I. But as both Philips and Dering display the characteristics of their predecessors, their music could hardly be omitted from this series.
Robert Johnson is an interesting figure. He was a Scottish priest, was delated (before the Reformation, of course) for heresy ; fled to England and settled down there. The few compositions of his which are still extant show him to have been a writer of real distinction. His music follows the ‘English’ tradition so distinctively that he has been included in this series. Are we to regard him as a naturalised Englishman or a renegade Scotsman? The point is too knotty (and even devastating) to be decided here, I am afraid.—R.R.T.

Tuesday 25 September 1934 18.30
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Tudor Church Music-I. Latin Motets sung by a small choir

Thursday 27 September 1934 18.30
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the Direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Tudor Church Music-I.
Latin Motets sung by a small choir

Friday 28 September 1934 19.10
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Tudor Church Music-I.
Latin Motets sung by a small choir.

Tuesday 2 October 1934 18.30
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Late Tudor Church Music, sung by The WIRELESS SINGERS

‘One would like to call this week’s programme ” The zenith of Tudor Church Music “, as it concludes with Byrd’s magnificent Mass for five voices which has been described as an epoch-making work, to be ranked in importance (i.e., as a landmark) with The Matthew Passion, ” The Ninth Symphony ” and the Nibehmgen Ring.

‘Byrd’s five-part Mass sums up the Tudor polyphonic period just as Patestrina’s Missa Papee Marcelli sums up the Italian. Great men (writing great music) followed both Byrd and Palestrina, but the two works I have mentioned stiU stand as high-water mark in their respective epochs.

‘Tye’s Euge bone falls very little short of that high-water mark. If it lacks the grave sweetness of Tallis’s Sine nomine, it makes up in the brilliancy of its part-writing and the broad and spacious lines on which it is conceived.

‘The title ” zenith ” is precluded by the inclusion in the week’s programmes of several works of a more or less tentative character-I mean the motets of Wilbye and others. Here we have attempts at an independent instrumental accompaniment allied with a perfect vocal technique.

‘Later in this series a week will be devoted to English Church music. But the present examples are included as they are contemporaneous with most of the Latin music that is being performed.’ R. R. T.

Wednesday 3 October 1934 19.05
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Late Tudor Church Music, sung by THE WIRELESS SINGERS

Thursday 4 October 1934 18.30
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Late Tudor Church Music, sung by THE WIRELESS SINGERS

Friday 5 October 1934 19.10
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Late Tudor Church Music, sung by THE WIRELESS SINGERS
Mass for Five Voices .. William Byrd

Monday 8 October 1934 19.05
From Plainsong to Purcell The Foundations of English Music Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
My Ladye Nevells Booke (William Byrd ) played by RUDOLPH DOLMETSCH (harpsichord)
The Marche before the Battell The Battell
The Galliarde for the Victorie
‘It is safe to say that as a nation-even up to the present-we have no conception of what the whole world of music owes to William Byrd. His vocal compositions (Masses, Motets and Madrigals) are receiving a certain amount of belated recognition, but the statement that he was the pioneer of European keyboard music is–even in England-received with polite incredulity by all save a few students.

‘Stripped of the ” special pleading ” of ill-equipped advocates, the fact remains that England has been an unmusical nation since the Restoration -unmusical in the sense that the art of music is no longer a necessity in her national life. ” The Englishman likes music, but can get along perfectly well without it”, is a saying which infuriates English highbrows and academics alike, but their irate description of it as a silly phrase is an unconscious tribute to its truth. People do not get angry at ” silly ” things.

‘ It was John Dunstable (an Englishman) who first gave form, structure and coherence to European choral music. It was William Byrd who first brought these qualities to European keyboard music. It was Byrd and his successors who gave Europe the ” In nomine “-the earliest example of coherent music for strings. (No examples of the ” In nomine ” are to be found in any other European country.)

‘ Surely these three facts are subjects for national pride. It is encouraging to find that an increasing number of British citizens are beginning to be interested in these facts. Once you get a person interested in ” the story ” of anything, he is in a fair way to become interested in the thing itself.’ R. R. T.
(An article on Lady Nevells Booke appears on page 12)

Tuesday 9 October 1934 18.30
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
My Ladye Nevells Booke (William Byrd )
Played by RUDOLPH DOLMETSCH (harpsicord)
My Ladye Nevells Grownde
Qui Passe for my Ladye Nevell
The Barelye Breake

Thursday 11 October 1934 18.30
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir Richard RUNCIMAN TERRY
My Ladye Nevells Booke (William Byrd ) played by RUDOLPH DOLMETSCH
(harpsichord)
The Galliarde to the Firste Pavian The Seconde Pavian
The Galliarde to the Seconde Pavian The Third Pavian
The Galliarde to the Third Pavian The Fourth Pavian
The Galliarde to the Fourth Pavian

Friday 12 October 1934 19.10
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
My Ladye Neveils Booke (William Byrd ) played by RUDOLPH DOLMETSCH
(harpsichord)
The Fifte Pavian
The Galliarde to the Fifte Pavian
Pavana the Sixte: Kinbrugh Goodd The Galliarde to the Sixte Pavian
The Seventh Pavian
The Eighte Pavian

Monday 15 October 1934 19.05
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
My Ladye Neveils Booke (William Byrd) played by RUDOLPH DOLMETSCH (harpsichord)
The Passinge Mesures: the Nynthe Pavian
The Galliarde to the Nynthe Pavian
A Voluntarie : for my ladye Nevell
Will you walke the woods soe wylde?
The Maidens Songe

Tuesday 16 October 1934 18.30
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
My Ladye Nevells Booke (William Byrd ) played by RUDOLPH DOLMETSCH
(harpsichord)
A lesson of Voluntarie The Second Grownde

Wednesday 17 October 1934 19.05
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
My Ladye Nevells Booke (William Byrd ) played by RUDOLPH DOLMETSCH
(harpsichord)
Have with yow to Walsingame
All in a garden grine
Lord Willobies Welcome Home
The Carman’s Whistle

Thursday 18 October 1934 18.30
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
My Ladye Neveils Booke
(William Byrd) played by RUDOLPH DOLMETSCH
(harpsichord)
Hughe Ashtons Grownde
A Fancie

Friday 19 October 1934 19.10
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
My Ladye Nevells Booke (William Byrd ) played by RUDOLPH DOLMETSCH
(harpsichord)
Sellingers Rownde
Munsers Almaine
The Tennthe Pavian: Mr. W. Peter
The Galliarde to the Tennthe Pavian

Monday 22 October 1934 19.05
From Plainsong to Purcell
Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Songs of Sundry Natures by William Byrd (1589)
Sung by THE WIRELESS SINGERS
Songs to Four Voices
I. Is love a boy ? (1 part) 2. Boy, pity me (2 part)
3. Wounded I am (I part) 4. Yet of us twain (2 part)
5. From Citheron the warlike boy (I part)
6. There careless thoughts (2 part)
7. If Love be just (3 part)

Tuesday 23 October 1934 18.30
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Songs of Sundry Natures by William Byrd (1589)
Sung by THE WIRELESS SINGERS
Songs to Four Voices
1. O Lord, my God
2. While that the Sun
Song to Five Voices
1. Weeping full sore

Wednesday 24 October 1934 19.05
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Songs of Sundry Natures by William Byrd (1589)
Sung by THE WIRELESS SINGERS
Songs to Five Voices
1. Penelope that longed
2. Compel the hawk to sit
3. See those sweet eyes (I part)
4. Love would discharge (2 part)

Thursday 25 October 1934 18.30
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Songs of Sundry Natures by William Byrd (1589)
Sung by THE WIRELESS SINGERS
Songs to Five Voices
1. When I was otherwise
2. When first by force
3. I thought that love
4. O dear life when may it be
5. Of gold all burnished (I part)
6. Her breath is more sweet (2 part)

Friday 26 October 1934 19.10
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Songs of Sundry Natures by William Byrd (1589)
Sung by THE WIRELESS SINGERS
Songs to Six Voices.
1. Behold, how good a thing (i part)
2. And as the pleasant morning dew(2 part)
3. And think ye, nymphs (2 part)
4. Love is a fit of pleasure (2 part)
5. If in thine heart thou nourish will
6. Unto the hills

Monday 29 October 1934 19.05
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir Richard Runciman Terry
Songs of Sundry Natures by William Byrd (1589)
Sung by The Wireless Singers with a consort of viols led by Rudolph Dolmetsch
I. Carol: From Virgin’s Womb
Chorus: Rejoice, Rejoice
2. Carol: An Earthly Tree
Chorus: Cast off all doubtful care
3. Dialogue between two shepherds
4. Christ rising again (first part)
Christ is risen again

Tuesday 30 October 1934 18.30
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Tudor Instrumental Music played by a consort of viols led by RUDOLPH
DOLMETSCH

Wednesday 31 October 1934 19.05
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir Richard RUNCIMAN TERRY
Tudor Instrumental Music played by a consort of viols led by RUDOLPH DOLMETSCH
7.25 Interval

Thursday 1 November 1934 18.30
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Tudor Instrumental Music played by a consort of viols led by RUDOLPH DOLMETSCH

Friday 2 November 1934 19.10
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Tudor Instrumental Music played by a consort of viols led by RUDOLPH DOLMETSCH

Monday 5 November 1934 19.05
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY NORFOLK FOLK SONGS sung by HARRY Cox
The Captain’s Apprentice The Shooting of his Dear
The Transports Young Edmund
Just as the tide was flowing

Tuesday 6 November 1934 18.30
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
EARLY INSTRUMENTAL SONGS sung by HERBERT HEYNER (baritone), played by a consort of viols :
RUDOLPH DOLMETSCH (treble viol)
CARL DOLMETSCH (treble viol)
CECILE DOLMETSCH (tenor viol)
NATALIE DOLMETSCH (viola da gamba)

Wednesday 7 November 1934 19.05
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
LUTENIST SONGS sung by HERBERT HEYNER (baritone) and played by DIANA POULTON (lute)

Thursday 8 November 1934 18.30
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
LUTENIST SONGS sung by HERBERT HEYNER (baritone) and played by DIANA POULTON (lute)
RUDOLPH DOLMETSCH (treble viol)
NATALIE DOLMETSCH (viola da gamba)

Friday 9 November 1934 19.10
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
LUTENIST SONGS sung by HERBERT HEYNER (baritone) and played by DIANA POULTON (lute)
JOHN DANYEL (1565-1630) a lutenist and song-writer and contemporary with Dowland, was a member with him of the ‘ King’s Musicians for the Lutes ‘. His father was a music master at Taunton, and his brother was Samuel Daniel, the poet.
ROBERT JONES, who took his Mus.Bac. in 1597, and flourished at the beginning of the seventeenth century, published several books of Ayres for voice and lute, and was a notable lutenist himself. Among other characteristics, it would appear that he had a fancy for writing madrigals on bird subjects.
THE FERRABOSCO family, originating in Italy with Domenico, born in 1513, was a numerous and distinguished one. His eldest son Alphonso (1543-1588) came to England, took service under the Queen, and was held in high esteem with his English colleagues. Alphonso’s son, Alfonso, was born at Greenwich and died there in 1628. He held office as musician to the courts of James I and Charles I. He, too, had a son, Alfonso, whose sons Henry and John appear to have ended the line musically. All were composers of merit, the two earlier Alfonsos of more than ordinary distinction.

Monday 12 November 1934 19.05
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Lutenist Songs
Sung by HERBERT HEYNER (baritone) played by DIANA POULTON (lute)

Tuesday 13 November 1934 18.30
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Airs and Madrigals by Michael Cavendish (1598)
Suna by HERBERT HEYNER (baritone)
THE WIRELESS SINGER
Played by DIANA POULTON (lute)
Songs for voice and lute
Mourn, Marcus, mourn
Have I vowed and must not break it Down in a valley
Songs for four voices and lute
Fair are those eyes
Wanton, come hither
Madrigals for five voices
Wandering in this place
Every busy new springing

Wednesday 14 November 1934 19.05
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Songs for Several Voices
Sung by THE WIRELESS SINGERS

Thursday 15 November 1934 18.30
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Songs for Several Voices by Thomas Whythorne (1571)
Sung by The WIRELESS Singers
Grace before Meat Grace after Meat
It doth me good when Zeph’rus reigns
The doubtful state that I possess
As thy shadow itself apply’th
It doth belong more of good right
Give not thy mind to heaviness

Friday 16 November 1934 19.10
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Airs and Madrigals
Sung by THE WIRELESS SINGERS

Tuesday 20 November 1934 18.30
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Madrigals
The Triumphes of Oriana
Sung by THE WIRELESS SINGERS

Wednesday 21 November 1934 19.05
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Madrigals
The Triumphes of Oriana
Sung by THE WIRELESS SINGERS

Thursday 22 November 1934 18.30
From Plainsong to Purcell The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Madrigals
The Triumphes of Oriana
Sung by THE WIRELESS SINGERS

Friday 23 November 1934 19.10
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Madrigals
The Triumphes of Oriana
Sung by …. THE WIRELESS SINGERS…
Songs to Six Voices,.

Monday 26 November 1934 19.05
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Post-Reformation Services and Anthems
Sung by THE WIRELESS SINGERS
The Great Service (Byrd)
Venite ; Te Deum ; Benedictus

Tuesday 27 November 1934 18.30
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir Richard RUNCIMAN TERRY
Post-Reformation Services and Anthems

Wednesday 28 November 1934 19.05
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the directicn of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Post-Reformation Services and Anthems
Sung by THE WIRELESS SINGERS
Anthems

Thursday 29 November 1934 18.30
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Post-Reformation Services and Anthems
Sung by THE WIRELESS SINGERS
Anthems
(Organist, BERKELEY MASON)

Friday 30 November 1934 19.10
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Post-Reformation Services and Anthems
Sung by THE WIRELESS SINGERS

Monday 3 December 1934 19.05
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Seventeenth Century Songs
Sung by JOHN ARMSTRONG (tenor)
ROBERT JOHNSON , whose father, John, was one of Queen Elizabeth’s Musicians for the Lute, was appointed also a Musician for the Lute by-James I, in 1624. He was afterwards attached to Prince Henry’s Household, and on the accession of Charles I,
Henry being dead, his post as Court Musician was confirmed anew. This song, ‘ As I walked forth ‘, was printed in Playford’s ‘ Ayres and Dialogues’.
DR. JOHN BLOW was one of the most eminent musicians of his day, which was the latter half of the seventeenth century. He served as Organist of the Chapel Royal under three Sovereigns. On the death of Purcell he was appointed Organist at Westminster Abbey and retained that office until the end of his life.
PELHAM HUMFREY was born in 1647 and died at the early age of twenty-seven. He was appointed a Gentleman of the Chapel Royal, and later Master of the Children, and Composer in Ordinary for the Violins to His Majesty. In his short life he composed several fine anthems. This song, ‘ I pass all my hours ‘ was first printed in Playford’s ‘ Choice Songs’. Humfrey is buried in Westminster Abbey.
WILLIAM LAWES and HENRY LAWES , half-brothers belonging to a distinguished English family of musicians, are represented in tomorrow’s Foundations. Henry, a Gentleman of the Chapel Royal, was a distinguished figure both as composer and performer. William was also a Gentleman of the Chapel Royal, and a highly esteemed composer. Henry was buried in Westminster Abbey, but William was killed in the Civil War.

Tuesday 4 December 1934 18.30
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Seventeenth Century Songs
Sung by JOHN ARMSTRONG (tenor)

Wednesday 5 December 1934 19.05
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Seventeenth Century Songs
Sung by JOHN ARMSTRONG (tenor)

Thursday 6 December 1934 18.30
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Alusic
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Seventeenth-Century Songs
Sung by JOHN ARMSTRONG (tenor)

Friday 7 December 1934 19.10
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RiCHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Seventeenth Century Songs
Sung by JOHN ARMSTRONG (tenor)
During the latter half of the seventeenth century the Playford family was responsible for the publication of practically all the English music printed during that period. John Playford , starting as a bookseller, published his first musical work, ‘ The English Dancing Master’, in 1651. From that year onwards his publications were *of the greatest value to English music, the history and importance of which are associated as much with the name of I honest’ John Playford as of anybody’s living at that time

John died in 1686 and had, therefore, time to publish such of Purcell’s music as saw print in the years before that date ; and it is quite in the spirit of the times that Purcell should have commemorated his death with. a piece of music specially written for the occasion.
This Pastoral Elegy is as appropriate a tribute as Purcell could have made, for amongst other things we are deeply indebted to Playford for his preservation of the great wealth of Country Dances, Airs and Ballads of the English people. The collection of tunes in Playford’s ‘ The English Dancing Master’ is immortal, and almost every English composer who has since his time set pen to music paper has, on some occasion or another, made use of the wonderful material contained in Playford’s famous volume.

Monday 10 December 1934 19.05
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Seventeenth Century Instrumental Music
Played by THE INTERNATIONAL STRING QUARTET: Andre Mangeot (violin); Walter Price (violin) ; Eric Bray (viola) ; Jack Shine bourne (violoncello)
(From British Museum M.S.)
7.25 Interval

Tuesday 11 December 1934 18.30
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Seventeenth Century Instrumental Music
Played by THE INTERNATIONAL STRING QUARTET:
Andre Mangeot (violin)
Walter Price (violin)
Eric Bray (viola)
Jack Shineboume (violoncello)

Wednesday 12 December 1934 19.05
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Seventeenth-Century Instrumental
Music
Played by THE INTERNATIONAL STRING QUARTET :
Andre Mangeot (violin)
Walter Price (violin)
Eric Bray (viola)
Jack Shinebourne (violoncello Amongst the most beautiful of all the music written for strings, the Fantazias of Purcell stand out almost alone. It would be wrong to say that they have only recently been discovered, but it is very certain that their extreme beauty has only recently been appreciated. Much of this is due to the late Philip Heseltine , who, with the assistance of Andre Mangeot , re-edited them and introduced them to the publishers The fact that in the Fantazia upon one note, to be played on Friday, Purcell makes use of the ingenious device of reiterating one note throughout the work does not detract in the least, as it might do in the hands of a man of lesser genius, from its almost extravagant loveliness.

Thursday 13 December 1934 18.30
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Seventeenth Century Instrumental Music
Played by THE INTERNATIONAL STRING QUARTET:
Andre Mangeot (violin)
Walter Price (violin)
Eric Bray (viola)
Jack Shinebourne (violoncello)
Sung by THE WIRELESS SINGERS
The Great Service (Byrd) (concluded)

Friday 14 December 1934 19.10
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Seventeenth Century Instrumental
Music
Played by THE INTERNATIONAL STRING QUARTET:
Andre Mangeot (violin)
Walter Price (violin)
Eric Bray (viola)
Jack Shinebourne (violoncello)

Monday 17 December 1934 19.05
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir Richard RUNCIMAN TERRY
Restoration Anthems
THE WIRELESS CHORUS
LESLIE WOODGATE (organ)
Adrian Batten. who died in London in 1637, was successively a choir-boy at Winchester Cathedral, vicar-choral of Westminster Abbey, and organist of St. Paul’s Cathedral. He was a voluminous composer, some of his anthems are still sung, but he is remembered chiefly in connection with the ‘ Batten Organ Book’, a collection of valuable sixteenth-century church music put into organ score by Batten himself.
Pelham Humphries (or Humfrcy) and Dr. John Blow were represented in this series a fortnight ago.
Matthew Locke (1630-1677) is now associated chiefly with his incidental music to Macbeth, but in his day he enjoyed considerable reputation as a composer for the church and the stage.
Benjamin Rogers (1614-1698) was born, and passed much of his career as a lay-clerk at St. George’s Chapel, at Windsor. He composed much Church Music.

Tuesday 18 December 1934 18.30
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Restoration Anthems
THE WIRELESS SINGERS
LESLIE WOODGATE (organ)

Wednesday 19 December 1934 19.05
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music Under the direction of Sir Richard RUNCIMAN TERRY
Restoration Anthems
THE WIRELESS SINGERS

Thursday 20 December 1934 18.30
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Restoration Anthems
THE WIRELESS SINGERS
LESLIE WOODGATE (organ)
Jehova quam multi sunt hostes
Praise the Lord, O Jerusalem by Purcell

Friday 21 December 1934 19.10
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music Under the direction of Sir Richard RUNCIMAN TERRY
Restoration Anthems
THE WIRELESS CHORUS, a Section of THE BOYD NEEL ORCHESTRA,
LESLIE WOODGATE (organ)
Kyrie Creed
Magnificat
Nunc Dimittis

Monday 24 December 1934 19.05
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Purcell’s Sonatas played by ANDRÉ MANGEOT (violin)
ANNE MACNACHTEN (violin)
AMBROSE GAUNTLETT (viola da gamba)
JOHN TICEHURST (harpsichord)
Sonata of three parts, No. 2 in B flat
Andante; Largo; Presto; Adagio-Vivace;
Allegro Sonata of three parts, No. 6 in C
Moderato; Canzona; Largo; Allegro

Wednesday 26 December 1934 19.05
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Purcell’s Sonatas
Played by ANDRÉ MANGEOT (violin)
ANNE MACNAUGHTEN (violin)
AMBROSE GAUNTLETT (viola da gamba)
JOHN TICEHURST (harpsichord)
Sonata of three parts, No. 9 in C minor
Adagio; Largo ; Canzona-Adagio;
Allegro Sonata of four parts, No. 6 in G minor
Adagio-piu allegro-piu mosso

Thursday 27 December 1934 18.30
From Plainsong to Purcell
The Foundations of English Music
Under the direction of Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Purcell’s Sonatas
Played by ANDRÉ MANGEOT (violin)
ANNE MACNAUGHTEN (violin)
AMBROSE GAUNTLETT (viola da gamba)
JOHN TICEHURST (harpsichord)
Sonata of four parts, No. 7 in C
Vivace; Largo; Grave ; Canzona;
Allegro Sonata of four parys, No. 9 in F (The
Golden)
Allegro; Adagio ; Canzona ; Grave; Allegro

National Programme
Monday 25 February 1935 22.05
WILLIAM BYRD (1543-1623)
Mass for Five Voices
Kyrie : Gloria : Credo :
Sanctus : Benedictus : Agnus Dei: sung by THE WIRELESS CHORUS
(Section B)
Conducted by Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
(An article on this work, by Sir Richard Terry , appears on page 11 [of the week’s Radio Times])

National Programme
Monday 28 October 1935 18.30
The Foundations of Music
The Complete Madrigals of Peter
Philips (c. 1560-c. 1628)
THE BBC SINGERS (A and B)
Conducted by Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Madrigali a 8 voci (Eight-part Madrigals) (1598)
Questa che co begl’ occhi Come potro giamai
Dispiegate guance amate
(2 parte) Tocca, tocca, bella bocca
Hor che dal sonno vinta Non più guerra
Sir Richard Terry points out that as the British Museum part-books are not quite complete, the lacunse have been supplied from those at Christ Church, Oxford, by permission of the Dean and Chapter.

Tuesday 29 October 1935 18.30
The Foundations of Music
The Complete Madrigals of Peter
Philips (c. 1500-c. 1628)
THE B B C SINGERS (A and B)
Conducted by Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Madrigali a 8 8 voci (1598) (continued)
Filli leggia dr’e bella
(2 parte) Mesta qui I’aria appare
(3 parte) Deh torna filli toma
(4 parte) Ogn’in subre pastore
(5 parte) Ben restaro le piante
(6 parte) Bato ; Canta sol filli sola
(7 parte) Ma lasso
(8 pane) Vannc canzon ‘a piedi

Wednesday 30 October 1935 18.30
The Foundations of Music
The Complete Madrigals of Peter
Philips (e. 1,56o-c. 1628)
THE B B C SINGERS (A and B)
Conducted by Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Madrigali a 8 voci (Eight-part Madrigals) (1598) (concluded)
Donna mi fugg’ ong’ hora Se per gridar ohime
Passando cor pensier per un boschetto (2 parte)
Noi starem troppo (3 parte)
Fuggendo tutte di pavra piene
Echo, Figlia (2 parte)
Echo che cosa e il fin d’amore

Thursday 31 October 1935 18.30
The Foundations of Music
The Complete Madrigals of Peter Philips (e. 1560-c. 1628)
THE B B C SINGERS (A) Conducted by Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
1. Libro de Madrigali a 6 voci (Six-part
Madrigals) (1596) Fece da voi partita
Lascian Ie fresche linse Di perle lagrimose Si, mi dicesti
Il dolce mormorio
Amor di propria man
(2 parte) La ninfa alhor
(3 parte) Cosi con lieto gioco

National Programme
Friday 1 November 1935 18.30
The Foundations of Music
The Complete Madrigals of Peter
Philips (c. 1560-c. 1628)
THE B B C SINGERS (A)
Conducted by Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
I. Libro de Madrigali a 6 voci (Six-part Madrigals) (1596) (continued)
Baciai per haver vita
Baciai ma che mi vals’ attender frutto
Chi vi mira e non sospira Apra a questo novo sol
(2 parte) Quel mentre gir’ intorno Mentr’ hor humile
(2 parte) Mentre di doglia

Regional Programme
Saturday 2 November 1935 21.00
A Recital of Madrigals by Peter Philips (c. 1560-c. 1628)
THE BBC SINGERS (A and B)
Conducted by Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY

National Programme

Monday 4 November 1935 18.30
The Foundations of Music
The Complete Madrigals of Peter Philips
(c. 1560—c. 1628)
THE B B C SINGERS (A)
Conducted by Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
I. Libro de Madrigaii a 6 voci (1596)
(concluded) (MS. edited by R. R. Terry )
Poi che voi non volete
Cantai mentre dispiacq’al mio bel sole
(2 parte) Resto qual huom ch’e dur’e aspra guerra lo son ferit’ hai lasso
(Riposta) S’io t’ho ferito Ut re mi fa sol la

National Programme
Tuesday 5 November 1935 18.30
The Foundations of Music
The Complete Madrigals of Peter
Philips (c. 1560-c. 1628)
THE B B C SINGERS (A)
Conducted by Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
Amor sei bei rubini (a 4) (2 Parte) Perche non poss’ ahime
(a 4) Voi volete ch’io muoia (a 4) Amor che voi ch’io facci (à 6)
Ditemi 6 Diva mia (a 8) Qui sott’ombrosi mirti Perche con tant’ ardore Scherza madonna, e dice
Fra in Acquario il sole Donna

National Programme
Wednesday 6 November 1935 18.30
The Foundations of Music
The Complete Madrigals of Peter Philips
(c. 1560-c. 1628)
THE B B C SINGERS (A)
Conducted by SIR Richard RUNCIMAN TERRY
II. Libro de Madrigali a 6 voci (1603)
(continued) (MS., edited R. R. Terry )
Lasso non e morir
Nero manto vi cinge
Tanta nc’ capei biondi Questa vita mortale
Porta nel viso Aprile
(2 parte) Quando urania rimiri il cielo
(3 parte) E quando fra

Friday 8 November 1935 18.30
The Foundations of Music
The Complete Madrigals of Peter
Philips (c. 1560-c. 1628)
THE B B C SINGERS (A)
Conducted by Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
II. Libro de Madrigali a 6 voci (1603)
(concluded) (MS., edited R. R. Terry ) Non e ferro
Chi vuol vedere un bosco
(2 parte) Chi vuol vedere un mare (3 parte) Chi vuol vedere l’inferno (4 parte) E chi saper desia

Regional Programme
Monday 23 December 1935 20.00
Carols from Other Countries
THE B B C SINGERS (B)
Conducted by SIR RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
O Hinds, tune up your pipes (Melody and words from Dictionnaire de Noels)
I the Angel am of God (Melody and words from Les Noels bressans)
If you Shepherds watch the lambing (Old Besancon Noel)
Shepherds, lead on to Bethlehem (Besancon Noel)
The Trumpet Carol (Burgundian Noël)
The Laundry Carol (Provencal Noel)
The Bagpipe Carol (Provencal Noel)
The Weather Carol (Provencal Noel)
The Peasant’s Pilgrimage (Provencal Noel)
I woke, from my couch uprising (Provencal Noel)
O Bethlehem (Old Basque Carol)
Three Kings came riding (Italian melody from the Laude Spirituali)
There was a maid so lovely (Dutch Carol of the Fifteenth century)
(Taken from Two Hundred Folk Carols by Sir Richard R. Terry)

National Programme
Sunday 11 October 1936 16.00
Richard Dering
Motets and Canzonets
BBC SINGERS (A)
Rosalind Rowsell Margaret Godley Gladys Winmill
Doris Owens
Bradbridge White
Martin Boddey
Stanley Riley Samuel Dyson
Conducted by Sir RICHARD TERRY
Canzonets to four voices
Dolce spirito d’amore 0 com’ e gran martire II mio martir I miei sospiri Donna crudel’ Ohime partito
Cantica sacra to six voices
Veni Jesu, Rex Panis angelicus
Jesu decus angelicum Cantate Domino
Canzonets to four voices
Gii ardente miei Longo da voi Vivro io mai
E se pur esser
Ite amari sospiri

National Programme
Monday 12 October 1936 18.55
Richard Dering Motets and Canzonets
BBC SINGERS (A)
Rosalind Rowsell Margaret Godley
Gladys Winmill
Doris Owens
Bradbridge White
Martin Boddey
Stanley Riley Samuel Dyson
ERNEST LUSH (harpsichord)
Conducted by Sir RICHARD TERRY
Canzonets to four voices
Occhi ladri d’amor Poiche mesto
Donna, s’el cor legasti Mirando la mia
Cantica sacra to six voices
Motet with harpsichord
Te invocamus
Unaccompanied Motets
Sancta et immaculata Jubilate Deo
Canzonets to four voices with harpsichord
E se ben nott’ Tutta gentill’
La vag’ e bell’ Aurora

National Programme
Tuesday 13 October 1936 21.40
Richard Dering Motets and Canzonets
BBC SINGERS (A)
Rosalind Rowsell, Margaret Godley, Gladys Winmill, Doris Owens, Bradbridge White, Martin Boddey,
Stanley Riley, Samuel Dyson
Conducted by Sir RICHARD TERRY
Canzonets to four voices
Donna gentil’ voi set Deh luce del mio cor Lagrime doice e care Ardor felic’e caro Ardenti miei
In questo muto Rosa d’amor
Cantica sacra to six voices
O vos omnes
Ardens est cor meum Congratulamini mihi Hei mihi Domine
Factum est silentium

National Programme
Thursday 15 October 1936 19.45
Richard Dering
Some comparisons with Palestrina
BBC SINGERS (A)
Rosalind Rowsell Margaret Godley
Gladys Winmill
Doris Owens
Bradbridge White
Martin Boddey
Stanley Riley Samuel Dyson
Conducted by Sir RICHARD TERRY

National Programme
Friday 16 October 1936 19.30
Richard Dering and his contemporaries
Settings of the Song of Solomon
BBC SINGERS (A)
Rosalind Rowsell Margaret Godley Gladys Winmill
Doris Owens Bradbridge White Martin Boddey
Stanley Riley Samuel Dyson
Conducted by Sir RICHARD TERRY

Tuesday 1 June 1937 21.00
MUSIC FOR WORSHIP-4
Mass for Five Voices by William Byrd
Kyrie; Gloria; Credo; Sanctus;
Benedictus ; Agnus Dei sung by The BBC Chorus (B)
Conducted by Sir Richard Runciman Terry
(From Regional)

National
Saturday 5 June 1937 22.00
SWING MUSIC
Discussed by Sir Richard Runciman Terry and illustrated by gramophone records

Other BBC Radio Programmes Associated with Richard Runciman Terry

(Programmes with which Terry is associated but not taking part – 1930s onwards)

National Programme
Friday 11 August 1933 19.30
Sailor Shanties THE WIRELESS MALE VOICE CHORUS
Conducted by CYRIL DALMAINE
WILLIAM PARSONS (Baritone)
At the Pianoforte, ERNEST LUSH
(All Items arr. Terry)
Good morning, ladies all (Halliards)
Several shanties have this title, but this particular time seems to have been confined to Blyth and Tyne ships.
The Wild Goose Shanty (Windlass and Capstan) Allusions to ‘ The Wild Goose Nation ‘ occur in many shanties, but there seems no clue as to the meaning of the term.

Reuben Ranzo (Halliards)
Ranzo’s identity must ever remain unknown. Possibly a corruption of the Portuguese ‘ Lorenzo,’ since Yankee whalers took many Portuguese men from the Azores.

Sally Brown (Windlass and Capstan)
In musical form a ‘ halliard ‘ shanty, yet always used for the capstan.

Hilo Somebody (Interchangeable)
Another shanty learnt by Dr. Terry as a boy from Blyth sailors. ‘ Blackbird ‘ and ‘ crew ‘ probably a perversion of ‘ blackbird and crow,’ a figure of speech occurring often in shanties.

Let the Bullgine run (Windlass and Capstan)
A Transatlantic origin is suggested by the refer. ence to ‘ Bullgine.’ Endless verses, no narrative, merely a recital of place-names, to and from which ‘ they ‘ were running.

Blow the man down (Halliards)
One of the best-known shanties among landsmen. ‘Winchester Street was the aristocratic quarter in South Shields, where only distinctive people such as shipowners and ‘ South-Spainer ‘ skippers lived.

Boney was a warrior (Halliards)
All seamen have hoisted topsails to this shanty, although why Jack should make a hero of Napoleon is a mystery.
Bound for the Rio Grande (Windlass and Capstan) This version is the most beautiful of many variants. ‘ Where are you going to, my pretty maid ? ‘ used frequently to be sung to this tune.

Whisky Johnny (Halliards)
Every collection includes some version of this favourite Bacchanalian chant.

Billy Boy
A ‘ coast’ song made into a shanty. The themo is common to folk-songs in various parts of the country.
The robust sentiments and strongly marked rhythm of sea shanties are both marks of their origin. Shanties are the sailors’ work-songs, sung to accompany and assist many of the operations on the old sailing ships. In those days, when sails had to be hauled, bilge-water pumped, the anchor raised by hand, the rhythm of a shanty sung in chorus would often lighten the labour. For the same reason, shanties fall into different groups according to the rhythmical needs of the job to be done. The two main forms are Hauling Shanties and Windlass and Capstan. A few are interchangeable. Tonight’s programme from Sir Richard Terry ‘s collection, ‘ The Shanty Book,’ contains a representative selection of these rousing popular songs.
(An article on Sea Shanties appears on page 271)
National Programme Sunday 2 February 1936 15.45
A Programme of Gramophone Records
Choir, conducted by Sir Richard Terry : Sanctus and Hosanna (Missa Papae Marcelli) (Palestrina)
Choir and Orchestra of The Bach
Cantata Club, conducted by Kennedy Scott : Rejoice in the Lord alway (Purcell) ; May no rash intruder (Nightingale Chorus) (Solomon) (Handel)
Walter Widdop (tenor), with Orchestra : Deeper and deeper still, Waft her angels (Jephtha) (Handel)
Elisabeth Schumann (soprano),
Margaret Balfour (contralto), with The London Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Albert Coates : Christe Eleison (Mass in B minor) (Bach)
The Philharmonic Choir, with The
London Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Albert Coates :Osanna(Mass in B minor) (Bach)
Hanna Seebach-Ziegler (soprano),
Jella von Braum-Fernwald (contralto), Hermann Gallos (tenor), Richard Mayr (bass), with Choir and Orchestra of Salzburg Cathedral, conducted by Joseph Messner : Benedictus, Agnus Dei, Lux Aetema, Cum Sanctis tuis (Requiem) (Mozart)

Wednesday 23 April 1941 19.15
‘OF MERRIE ENGLAND’
A programme for St. George’s Day chosen from the music of Sir Edward German with Linda Gray
Dennis Noble
Edmund Donlevy
BBC Theatre Chorus
Trained by Charles Groves
BBC Theatre Orchestra
Leader, Tate Gilder
The programme produced and conducted by Stanford Robinson
German was a true country-bred Englishman-he was born in 1862 at Whitchurch, Shropshire. In his best and most characteristic work he brought to our cities’, said Sir Richard Terry , ‘ a breath of that changeless spirit of rural England that finds some answering echo in every British heart, however cosmopolitan its environment. That is what gives German’s music its enduring charm. Its changeless English spirit keeps it as fresh with the young people of today as with the old folk of the ‘nineties ‘. One need recall only Germans incidental music to Henry VIII and Nell Gwyn and his opera Merrie England to realise the truth of Terry’s words.

5WA Cardiff
Thursday 17 December 1931 21.40
A Concert
by THE CITY OF BRISTOL POLICE BAND
(By permission of the Bristol Watch Committee)
Director of Music, Captain F. N. WOOD , M.V.O.,
Late Director of Music, Scots Guards
EDNA WILSON , a West Country artist, studied at the Royal College of Music and holds the ‘ Performers ‘ Diploma of both: the Royal College of Music and the Royal Academy of Music. Amongst her competition successes, she won a Gold Medal at the Bristol Eisteddfod in the Dramatic Soprano contest adjudicated by Sir Richard Terry.

Regional Programme
Sunday 26 May 1935 15.00
The Scottish Psalter of 1635
A Tercentenary Tribute
Relayed from St. Giles’s Cathedral, Edinburgh
Lee Lecture by the Rev. MILLAR PATRICK, D.D. With examples sung by the combined choirs of St. Giles’s Cathedral, and St. Andrew’s (Drumsheugh) Church, Edinburgh, conducted by W. GREENHOUSE ALLT, Mus.Doc.
The Scottish Psalter of 1635, to which this tercentenary tribute is being paid, is the most notable musical production in Scottish church history. The music is of such general interest that Sir Richard Terry is publishing a reprint of the book, giving the tunes in their 1635 arrangements and adding modernised settings of his own.
Dr. Millar Patrick , who gives the Lee Lecture, is well known as an authority on church music. He has come to the microphone on several occasions in connection with the fortnightly recitals of Scottish Psalm Tunes to supply notes and put the psalms in their correct historic setting.

Regional Programme
Tuesday 13 August 1935 21.40
THE CLYDEBANK MALE VOICE CHOIR
The Clydebank Male Voice Choir was formed about 1900 under the leadership of Charles Rennie. They have long been active supporters of the festival movement, and their enthusiasm has raised them to a very high class as exponents of male voice choral music. A few years ago they were awarded 216 marks out of 220 at Edinburgh Musical Festival, when Sir Richard Terry was adjudicating. (From Regional)

Compositions by Richard Runciman Terry (incomplete as at 16 April 2017):

Compositions by R R Terry

Magnificat and Nunc Dimittis in E flat.
London & New York : Novello, Ewer and Co, 1891

A Simple Setting of the Benedicite, omnia opera, for use in Advent and Lent
London: Hart & Co. 1893

Mass of St Gregory – For Four Voices SATB with Organ
London : Cary and Co 1896

Mass of St Dominic for Four Voices SATB
London : Cary and Co., 1899

Cor Jesu – Motet SATB
J. Fischer & Bro., New York, 1899

Saviour again to Thy dear Name. Anthem for Treble Voices.
London : Office of “The Organist”, 1899

A Short and easy Mass – No. 3. On the theme “Veni Sancte Spiritus” for four voices with or without organ
London : Cary & Co, 1904

Short Mass in C – No. 4. – for voices in unison with Organ accompaniment
Cary & Co. 1904

Mass of St. Bruno. A short unison Mass in B flat – No. 6 – with organ accompaniment, etc.
Cary & Co. 1907

A Short and Easy Requiem Mass for four mixed voices, with the Absolution
Cary & Co. 1907

Benediction Service for voices in unison and Organ
1910

The Westminster Hymnal
1912

Old Rhymes with New Tunes
London : Longmans, Green & Co., 1912

Twelve Christmas Carols
J. Curwen & Sons. 1912

Tu es Petrus. Motet for four voices and organ.
London : Cary & Co, 1914

The Angels sing around the Stall.
London : J. Curwen & Sons, 1921

The Shanty Book Part i : 30 Shanties
London : J. Curwen & Sons, 1921

Old Rhymes with New Tunes
London : Longmans Green, 1923

Old Christmas Carols – Part i (edited Terry)
Burns, Oates & Washbourne Ltd., London, 1923

The Wild Rose. Unison Song, poem from the German of Goethe.
London : J. Curwen & Sons, 1924

Thanksgiving. Two-part Song
London : J. Curwen & Sons, 1924

Three Cradle Songs for unison singing. 1. Sleep, Baby, sleep. 2. Flowers are closed, and lambs are sleeping. 3. Golden Slumbers
London : J. Curwen & Sons, 1924

More Old Rhymes with New Tunes
London : Longmans Green, 1925

The Shanty Book Part ii : 35 Shanties
London : J. Curwen & Sons, 1926

Still More Old Rhymes with New Tunes
London : Longmans, 1927

Good Day Sir Christmas. Carol for four voices
London : J. Curwen & Sons, 1929

Richard de Castre’s Prayer to Jesus.
London : J. Curwen & Sons, 1929

Mass for Five Voices – Byrd (edited Terry)
London : J. Curwen & Sons, 1935

Motet : Justorem Animas

Carol : On the Road to Bethlehem

Te Deum Laudamus in D (Latin), for Voices and instruments made for St Cecilia’s day 1694 – Purcell arr: Terry

Books and Essays:

Catholic Church Music:
London : Greening and Co., May 1907

Voodoism in Music and Other Essays

A Forgotten Psalter and Other Essays
Oxford University Press, 1929.
Hardcover. Table of Contents: A Forgotten Psalter 1-26pp.; English and Italian Polyphony 27-36pp.; Troubadour in Fact and Fiction 37-56pp.; John Merbecke 57-83pp.; Some Unpublished Tallis 84-92pp.; Some Sistine Chapel Traditions 93-104pp.; Why is Church Music so Bad 105-124pp.; Organs and Choirs 126-129pp.; Church Music and Popular Fallacies 130-140pp.; Sailor Shanties 141-169pp.; Music as a Factor in Education 170-177pp.; Samuel Sebastian Wesley 178-189pp.; and Early Belgian Composers 190-206pp. From the Ackowledgements page: The chapter on A Forgotten Psalter was written for this book; that on Merbecke was a paper read before the Musical Association.

Thomas Terry appointed to Ellington School, Northumberland, 1858:

Morpeth Herald – Saturday January 9 1858
THE ELLINGTON BOYS SCHOOL
Will open on Monday next, January 11th under the mastership of Mr. THOMAS TERRY late a pupil in the YORK TRAINING SCHOOL. For terms apply to the Master.
Cresswell Parsonage, Jan 5, 1858.

Thomas Terry – the Musician:

Morpeth Herald Saturday 23 July 1859
CRESSWELL CHORAL SOCIETY
THE FIFTH CONCERT of the Cresswell Choral Society will be held in the CRESSWELL SCHOOL ROOM, on Wednesday Evening, August 3, 1859. The Concert will commence at 7 o’clock. For Tickets, (price 6d. each) apply to Mr. Thomas Terry, Schoolmaster, Ellington.

(Similar notice for fourth concert in 1858 ends: “The proceeds of the concert will be applied in aid of the expenses of the Classes.”)

Terry’s Parents and Their Marriage:

Alnwick Mercury – Monday 2 March 1863
At BISHOPWEARMOUTH CHURCH, Sunderland, on the 21st ult., by the Rev. B. Mathie, incumbent of St. Paul’s, Mr. Thomas Terry, schoolmaster, Ellington, to Marion Jane Ballard, eldest daughter of Mr. Walter Runciman, Cresswell.

Birth of Child and Death of Terry’s Mother 1875:

Morpeth Herald Sat 20 Nov 1875 At the School-house, Newton Hall, Stocksfield-on-Tyne, 10th inst., the wife of Mr. Thomas Terry, of a son.
Morpeth Herald Sat 27 Nov 1875 At the Schoolhouse, Newton Hall, Stocksfield-on-Tyne, 23rd inst., aged 38, Marion Jane Ballard, the beloved wife of Mr. Thomas Terry. (Tues 23 Nov 1875)

Death of Terry’s Father:

TERRY Thomas of 36 Kingsley-place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne died 30 March 1905. Probate Newcastle-upon-Tyne 20 may to Walter Runciman the younger, shipowner and Arthur Octavius Terry gas-company’s clerk. Effects £265 10s.

[Thomas Terry born c.1840 Richmond, Yorkshire; died 30 March 1905 Newcastle-upon-Tyne.]

Terry’s Sister:

Northumberland Yesterday and Today – Book
Paperback. 212 pages. Dimensions: 9.0in. x 6.0in. x 0.5in. Jean Finlay Terry (1865-1951) was eldest daughter of Thomas Terry, schoolmaster, and Marion Jane Ballard Runciman. She was brought up at Seaton Carew, Hauxley and Newton Hall (Bywell St Peter). She became a schoolmistress and did not marry. She was sister of Sir Richard Runciman Terry 1864-1938, musical scholar and Master of Music at Westminster Cathedral.

Attempting to Understand Richard Runciman Terry and the Need for a Thorough Objective Biography

Now don’t get me wrong. If ever any composer deserved a proper biography it is Terry. But to do him proper justice and get a fair picture, Terry’s biography needs to cover every aspect of his life, development, personal tragedies and personality objectively and accurately including every aspect of his music making and every aspect of his compositions and arrangements.

His music (a small amount of which may be lost) is still held in some considerable esteem. A high proportion of it is quite arresting and beautiful (if you ignore some of the very fast tempo marks and apply some musical common sense). It is also quite reasonable to suppose that his former pupil Anthony Gregory Murray (quoted above) thought enough of his erstwhile Master to quote him as the opening melody in his most famous composition – one which to date has gone right round the English-speaking world in D major.

To study Terry is frustrating. Essentially he was a miniaturist but it is doubtful that he would have regarded that as a compliment.

In the end, the question about him should be this: Does the music speak to you?

The answer is an unequivocal “Yes.”

Richard Runciman Terry – 3 January 1864 – 18 April 1938

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